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WHY BOTHER?

Participating in the Arts is widely recognised to help people express their emotions, improve their self-esteem, relieve stress, process trauma, and most importantly, feel empowered and connected.

 

Our aim is to reach people who have been marginalised from mainstream society, by providing a specifically focussed, accessible and non-judgmental opportunity to engage in our community of people with similar experiences, we hope to bring this group gently out from the shadows and into 'The Morning After'.

OUR APPROACH

Given the multiple barriers and complexity people in recovery from addiction experience, we use an effective approach by delivering a bespoke solution, tailored to meet the needs of individuals rather than adopting a “one-size fits all” approach, it feels personal but has a top level structure.

These creative and arts-based workshops provide a bespoke but structured process that allows gradual exploration of people’s emotions, feelings, and life experiences.

The start of a workshop course typically involves theatre games and exercises that are highly distant from participants’ personal lives and experiences. We then ease in, after starting to build trust, with activities such as fictional story development, or at least one step removed from the lives of participants.

Then we move on to the development of characters and stories through activities that remain fictional but, in some way, represent distant versions of the participants’ lived experiences. By the middle of the program we begin
co-developing the narratives, activities, characters, stories, etc. that become more personal and closer to the real-life experiences of participants.

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BRISTOL 

The start of a workshop course typically involves theatre games and exercises that are highly distant from participants’ personal lives and experiences. We then ease in, after starting to build trust, with activities such as fictional story development, or at least one step removed from the lives of participants.

Then we move on to the development of characters and stories through activities that remain fictional but, in some way, represent distant versions of the participants’ lived experiences. By the middle of the program we begin
co-developing the narratives, activities, characters, stories, etc. that become more personal and closer to the real-life experiences of participants.

LONDON

The start of a workshop course typically involves theatre games and exercises that are highly distant from participants’ personal lives and experiences. We then ease in, after starting to build trust, with activities such as fictional story development, or at least one step removed from the lives of participants.

Then we move on to the development of characters and stories through activities that remain fictional but, in some way, represent distant versions of the participants’ lived experiences. By the middle of the program we begin
co-developing the narratives, activities, characters, stories, etc. that become more personal and closer to the real-life experiences of participants.

WESTON-SUPER-MARE

The start of a workshop course typically involves theatre games and exercises that are highly distant from participants’ personal lives and experiences. We then ease in, after starting to build trust, with activities such as fictional story development, or at least one step removed from the lives of participants.

Then we move on to the development of characters and stories through activities that remain fictional but, in some way, represent distant versions of the participants’ lived experiences. By the middle of the program we begin
co-developing the narratives, activities, characters, stories, etc. that become more personal and closer to the real-life experiences of participants.

OXFORD

The start of a workshop course typically involves theatre games and exercises that are highly distant from participants’ personal lives and experiences. We then ease in, after starting to build trust, with activities such as fictional story development, or at least one step removed from the lives of participants.

Then we move on to the development of characters and stories through activities that remain fictional but, in some way, represent distant versions of the participants’ lived experiences. By the middle of the program we begin
co-developing the narratives, activities, characters, stories, etc. that become more personal and closer to the real-life experiences of participants.

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